Please Tell Us Your City

Knowing your city will help us provide relevant content to you.

Sorry! No matching results found. Try again. Error Identifying Your Location.

Log in to CarWale

Please enter your password
Please enter your registered email

Sign up to CarWale

Please enter your name
+91
Please enter your mobile number
Please enter your password
Please enter your password

Please tell us your city

Knowing your city helps us provide relevant content for you

No city match.
Ad

Motion Induced Blindness Please read if you drive regularly

#1 29-Jun, 2012 03:42 PM
Suresh P
Long-termer
Joined Date: 17 Jul 2011
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 183
Likes: 25
Very interesting article, posted on FB by Anant Bhatia, I thought it is very useful and hence sharing on the forum.

Motion Induced Blindness

In a motor accident, wherein a speeding car hits a slower moving vehicle coming from the side, the speeding car drivers often swear that they just didn’t see the vehicle coming from the left or right.

Well, they aren’t lying. They really don’t see the vehicle coming from the side, in spite of broad daylight. This phenomenon on the car drivers’ part is known as “Motion Induced Blindness”. It is unbelievable but it is true, and it is definitely frightening. Armed forces pilots are taught about motion induced blindness during training, because it happens faster at high speeds; and to some extent it is applicable to car drivers also, especially the fast ones. So, if
you drive a car, please read this carefully.

Once airborne, pilots are taught to alternate their gaze between scanning the horizon and scanning their instrument panel, and never to fix their gaze for more than a couple of seconds on any single object. They are taught to continually keep their heads on a swivel and their eyes always moving. Because, if you fix your gaze on one object long enough while you yourself are in motion, your peripheral vision goes blind. That’s why it is called motion induced blindness. For fighter pilots, this is the only way to survive in air; not only during aerial combat, but from peacetime hazards like mid-air collisions as well.

Till about three decades ago, this “heads on swivel & eyes moving” technique was the only way to spot other aircraft in the skies around. Now-a-days they have on-board radars, but the old technique still
holds good.

  Just click on the link below. You will see a revolving array of blue crosses on a black background. There is a flashing green dot in the centre and three fixed yellow dots around it. If you fix your gaze on the green dot for more than a few seconds, the yellow dots will disappear at random, either singly, or in pairs, or all three together. In reality, the yellow dots are always there. Just watch the yellow dots for some time to ensure that they don’t go anywhere!

MSF(http://www.msf-usa.org/motion.html)
You can alter the background colour or the rpm of the array by clicking the appropriate buttons. Notes given by the author below the rotating array are educative.)

So, if you are driving at a high speed on a highway and if you fix your gaze on the road straight ahead, you will not see a car, a scooter, a buggy, a bicycle, a buffalo or even a human being approaching from the side. Now reverse the picture. If you are crossing a road on foot and you see a speeding car approaching. There’s a 90% chance that the driver isn’t seeing you, because his/her peripheral vision may be blind! And you may be in that blind zone!!
 
So readers please share this information to all who drive regularly and please post your comments as they might help to save some lives.

Note:please move or merge this thread accordingly,sourced from Facebook


0 members liked this post
 
#2 29-Jun, 2012 07:12 PM
Sankalp
Moderator
Joined Date: 28 Mar 2009
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 3936
Likes: 628

This is very important. Thanks for the share. Here is a diagram showing how the field of vision of a driver decreases with increase in speed:

Some people have the habit of concentrating seriously in the path ahead, but I advise looking around  to check out pedestrians, oncoming vehicles etc.




Return of petrol power!!
0 members liked this post
 
#3 29-Jun, 2012 08:47 PM
Suresh P
Long-termer
Joined Date: 17 Jul 2011
Location: Hyderabad
Posts: 183
Likes: 25

Hi Sankalp,

                Very nice and helpful post with good explaination through the diagram.Can you post the source where you got it.



0 members liked this post
 
#4 29-Jun, 2012 08:53 PM
Sankalp
Moderator
Joined Date: 28 Mar 2009
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 3936
Likes: 628

That is from one of my user manuals.




Return of petrol power!!
0 members liked this post
 
#5 30-Jun, 2012 11:01 PM
Tomy Thomas
Legend
Joined Date: 01 Nov 2010
Location: Thiruvananthapuram
Posts: 1175
Likes: 176

I saw a program in National Geographic sometime back. It was talking about the reason for accidents, whatever measures we take. Speed is the primary cause.

Humans cannot run faster than around 40Kmph (I think the Olympic record for 100m sprint is around 37.6Kmph). Hence our brains are designed to process images only at a speed of what we can see when we are moving at upto around 40Kmph. If we use machines and exceed that, the brain has no choice but to drop some information received by the eyes. This is what is translating to narrowing of field of vision.

We all know that we have very good contol and vision when we are driving at 40Kmph or lesser. Even in the diagram given by Sankalp, it strarts from 40Kmph onwards, not something lesser.

Tomy



Last Updated: 30-Jun, 2012 11:05 PM, by tomy
0 members liked this post
 
#6 01-Jul, 2012 12:08 PM
Sankalp
Moderator
Joined Date: 28 Mar 2009
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 3936
Likes: 628

Very true. At slow speeds, we can have better field of vision and we can process all kinds of information, like pedestrians, road markings, etc. There's an abandoned runway in my native which we use for checking top speeds, spins etc. Once the speed crosses around 140, the vision is limited to a small area, comparable to the area of road markings. If one has played need for speed recent versions, it is similar to the view when under boost. That was when we thought of not trying such speeds on civilian roads. Maybe in foreign countries where we have closed roads, autobahns etc we can speed, but not in our so called expressways.




Return of petrol power!!
0 members liked this post
 
Ask the experts 1800 2090 230 Mon-Fri & Sun (10 AM - 7 PM)
Sat (10 AM - 5:30 PM)
Toll free